C.S. Lewis: Literary Mentor

C.S. Lewis: Literary Mentor

Discovering C.S. Lewis I discovered C.S. Lewis (affectionately referred to as Jack) years ago as a college Senior. I started with the Chronicles of Narnia. I’ve always been a reader who delves into a body of work, and then branching out to read about the author....

Amber Fonseca

Teacher Profile Amber Fonseca Teacher Amber teaches high school level World Literature and Composition, English Tutoring 7-12 and ACT English PREP. About Amber Nobody knows the faith required to walk the home education path like a prior homeschool graduate turned...
Tween & Teen Books Recommendations from our Writing Club!

Tween & Teen Books Recommendations from our Writing Club!

Tween & Teen Book Recommendations from our Writing Club!

Because writers are readers, book reviews are a regular part of our bi-monthly Writing Club! Check out what our True North Homeschool Academy Tweens and Teens are reading and see if you can’t find something new to add to your book list!

Analogy

  • The Knight & Kingdom series by Chuck Black -5*
  • Cross Roads by Paul Willis -5*
  • The Boundless by Kenneth Oppel -3.5*
  • Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis -5*  An insightful, thought-provoking piece, done by the ever brilliant CS Lewis, on the old, well known Cupid and Psyche myth. Something to be aware of: this book is a CS Lewis masterpiece, and therefore if you do not look past the face of this book, then you have missed the entire point of CS Lewis. This is a layered book. And I mean LAYERED. Though the writing is simple enough, the ideas, metaphors, and insight are all pretty hefty. Don’t read this if you aren’t ready to think deeply.


Christian Horror

  • The Visitation, Frank Peretti -4* A burned-out pastor struggles and grows in his faith as a man claiming to be Jesus shows up in his town.  Supernatural events turn the small town upside-down…he must take action. Good read overall- drags towards the middle, but once you get towards the end you’re almost afraid to put it down!

Classical

  • Silas Marner, By George Eliot – 5* Set in old England, it walks through the life of a falsely accused weaver and his slow redemption.

Dystopian

  • Fahrenheit 451; Ray Bradbury -5*  What would happen if books were illegal? What would happen if America gave up on substance and chased after pleasure? Ray Bradbury looks into this idea in his classic, award-winning Fahrenheit 451. From the view of a Firefighter, whose whole job is to burn books, life isn’t going well. His wife almost commits suicide, he isn’t happy, and war is on the horizon. Through curiosity, and something like instinct he starts to snitch books, and after a particularly rough day, decides to see what’s inside them, which launches him into a odd sort of journey, or adventure, but I think it’s a little more interesting than that, I just don’t know what else to call it.
  • The Unwanteds -5 * 


Fantasy

  • The Hobbit by Tolkien- (fantasy) -5* Bilbo was a hobbit. He didn’t do much, and he didn’t go anywhere. But he had a friend who happened to be a wizard, who decided that it is about time Bilbo ought to have an adventure. After being horrified at the amount of personality that can fit into the small body of a dwarf, not to mention their appalling manners, Bibo eventually joins a bond with the plus-sized personalities of the dwarfs and has the opportunity to have a riddle contest not only with a dilapidated hobbit but also a dragon. Plus he also gets to sing songs with elves, and travel through giant spider infested forests. What more could you ask for?
  • The Menagerie Trilogy by Sue Ann Carter Sutherland -5*
  • The Ascendance Trilogy, by Jennifer Nelson -5*This is the story of a mischievous prince ascending to his throne despite the many obstacles.  Five stars.
  • The Lord of the Rings by J.R. Tolkien -4* When Frodo Baggins inherits a magical ring, he is thrown headlong into the quest of a lifetime.  This epic novel tells a story of love, bravery and the extraordinary battle between good and evil.  Although rather long, it is a suspenseful and action-packed read to the very end.
  • Michael Vey series, by  Richard Paul Evans 4*  This seven-book series is the story of teenagers with abilities involving electricity.  It is not strictly Christian, but an adventurous read.
  • Kensuke’s Kingdom by M Markpuro -4.5*
  • Wings of Fire series by Tui T. Sutherland -5* -Clay, Tsunami, Sunny, Starflight, and Glory must save the world with their awesomeness.  A giant war is raging…but what can five dragonets do? Sutherland gives wonderful voice to her characters, and though it’s at an easy reading level, you can’t put it down until you’ve read cover to cover (or book 1 to book 5).
  • Michael Vey series, by  Richard Paul Evans. 4*This seven-book series is the story of teenagers with abilities involving electricity.  It is not strictly Christian, but an adventurous read. 
  • The Ascendance Trilogy, by Jennifer Nelson. 5*This is the story of a mischievous prince ascending to his throne despite the many obstacles.

 

Historical Fiction

  • The King of Shadows (Shakespeare’s Time) -5*
  • Carry on, Mr. Bowditch   -5* (colonial America)
  • The Star Under the City -5* (WWII)
  • Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz -5* (WWII)
  • Michael O’Shaunessey and his parents are spies in Germany during WWII.  When he joins (infiltrates) the Hitler youth, things get complicated. This is a fantastic book.  Humor, suspense, history, adventure…this book has got it all.
  • Island of the Blue Dolphins by Scott O’Dell -4*


How To

  • How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie -5* One word: Fascinating!  I don’t agree with all of his policies, but the amount of examples he gives as evidence of success is astounding! Dale Carnegie not only has an amazing writing style, and wonderful stories, but his content is worth looking into. Whether you are in the workplace, with your kids, or with human beings in general, How to win friends and influence people could be the answer to well, some, your problems.

Mystery

  • The Mystery & the Minister’s Wife Series -5*
  • The Secret of the Golden Cowrie by Gloria Repp- 5* This book is about a little girl trying to find a precious shell while escaping danger along the way.

So there are our top book recommendations.  How about you?  What are you reading?

Book recommendations given by our amazing Writing Club members: Parker, Hannah, Emily, Gabi, Malachi, Ada, Venetia, and Sydney.

(Interested in joining the True North Homeschool Academy writing club?  You can check it out here.)

Are you looking for great books to read with your homeschooler in 2019? Check out this list of recommendations from the True North Homeschool Academy writing club! #homeschooling #homeschool #TrueNorthHomeschoolAcademy #booklists #reading

 

The Low-Carb Homeschool Holiday Dinner

The Low-Carb Homeschool Holiday Dinner

(The following is a guest post from True North Homeschool Academy teacher Amber Fonseca.)

I can’t be the only homeschool mom that is attempting to host a tasty AND nutritious Thanksgiving dinner while trying to educate my little man… Oh! Did I mention that I also have a disability and my little is autistic bipolar? I know, I’m a little crazy, but I have a plan!

That’s the most important part of any Thanksgiving dinner, right? Having a plan makes things more manageable and allows you the ability to know where to adjust as the inevitable unplanned happenings occur. Yup, right up there with having a plan is the necessary skill of being able to adjust the plan when the unexpected happens. How? Well, everyone’s plan and backup plan will look different, but here are some helpful tools that anyone can adjust to fit into their own holiday preparations.

  1. Shop early – there will be things that you forget, but having the majority of your shopping done before the masses hit the grocery stores will lessen your stress and allow you to ensure everything on your list is available.
  2. Spread out the cooking – Don’t try to do all of the cooking in one day. I make my rolls first because I can put them in the freezer. Then I make things that don’t require refrigeration (brownies, even low-carb can sit on the counter for a couple of days with no problems). The ingredients (like eggs) will often come from the fridge, and you will slowly give yourself more space for things that MUST go in the fridge once you are done making them.
  3. Use your helpers! We homeschool. That means that while other children are still in school, ours are home and available to help. Younger kids can create decorations as you discuss why Thanksgiving exists, middle and older kids can help with the cooking. Home-economics at its finest!
  4. Don’t try to keep up with the three R’s. Yes, you can have your kids do the math associated with cooking; that isn’t what I mean. It is perfectly okay to take a few days away from written work and focus on relationships and family. I am far from being Super-mom, and there is no way that I can keep up with it all AND continue our regular class work.
  5. Enjoy your family. No matter how much pain I am in or how stressed I may be trying to figure out the carb counts associated with every meal I make, my goal is to enjoy spending time with my son and with my parents when they arrive.

These are just my top five recommendations, as a diabetic with other disabilities including RSD/CRPS and back damage, there are more items on my list. I don’t have the ability to stand and cook for hours and hours. I have to take breaks, I have to give myself time, and I have to accept that my body may not always cooperate.

Here are some added preparations for those of us with disabilities.

  1. Pre-plan your recipes AND your grocery list – knowing what you are cooking and what you need to purchase will make a HUGE difference as you move through your preparations.
  2. Order groceries delivered or for pick-up! Save your time and energy. Pick-up in most places doesn’t cost anything extra but makes a huge difference on your energy levels.
  3. Plan for easy meals, maybe even take-out, for the week leading into Thanksgiving. Your fridge is likely overrun with supplies for the big day, so planning easy meals like spaghetti (I have a low-carb high-protein pasta) or salads don’t use up the energy needed for cooking.
  4. Keep it easy – Don’t try to make two versions of everything. It is okay to have some foods that are not on your diet if you know the majority of the people coming will appreciate it and eat it. Meanwhile, other items can be replaced completely. Stuffing is replaceable here. I heard that gasp! Seriously though, my family grew up eating mashed potatoes over stuffing. This means that I can make Cauliflower Mashed Potatoes and there is no need to make my amazing stuffing. If we had a larger group, I might, but this year the stuffing has been axed!
  5. Take your time and take breaks – I started cooking almost a week in advance. I made my rolls and put them in the freezer, then I made the cranberry sauce and put it in the freezer as well. Next, I will make my sweet potato casserole and the green bean casserole. I will wait until the big day before I add toppings at the last minute. Spreading out the different dishes allows me to better manage my pain levels. On the day of – the only thing I should have left will be the turkey.

Now that you know my lists, I have one more thing to share — a low-carb high-protein bread recipe that actually tastes AMAZING. I needed a recipe that let me think I was cheating with a good-ol’ yeasty roll slathered in butter, and this recipe let me do that while still controlling my blood sugars!

  • 1 packet quick activated yeast
  • *Mix these and set it aside*
  • ½ cup softened butter
  • ¾ cup sour cream
  • ¾ cup ricotta cheese
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 2 cups Almond Flour (set ½ cup aside)
  • ¾ cup GF Flour (or regular if you aren’t gluten-free)
  • ½ cup egg based unflavored protein powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • ¼ cup warm/hot water

Mix your dry ingredients in one bowl and then cut in the butter until the butter is mixed in and creates a fine crumble in the flours. In a separate bowl, blend together the sour cream, ricotta, and eggs. By this time, the yeast and water should be nice and frothy. Mix the yeast into the sour cream and egg mixture. Lastly, slowly add the flour ingredients into the liquid ingredients. The dough will likely still be a bit sticky. Mix/knead in the last ½ cup of almond flour. If the dough is still to wet to shape, you can add more almond flour, OR you can place it into a muffin pan and make muffin rolls. The dough can also be placed in a bread pan. Bake at 350 until the top and edges are lightly browned, and a knife comes out clean. Enjoy!

Happy Holidays! 

Amber bio

About Amber – Nobody knows the faith required to walk the home education path like a prior homeschool graduate turned homeschool mom. Often, when God calls us to walk in faith, the first step is the hardest. My parents took that step when I was in elementary school: they withdrew my public school enrollment and we started our homeschool journey. Years later, I graduated college armed with an English Language Arts degree, a teacher’s certification, and a passion for teaching English. Choosing to home educate my son meant that I would no longer be able to teach Lit & Comp, (College) Composition I and C.S. Lewis to high school students – or so I thought. I am excited for this amazing opportunity to share my passion for English with homeschool students online!

 

Are you looking for low-carb holiday dinner ideas? Check out these tips from True North Homeschool Academy!

 

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