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When our kids struggle with math, it is often difficult to find a good “fit” to teach skills.  Older students who struggle with lower math don’t want something that looks “baby-ish” or has a lower grade level plastered all over it!  Here are some suggestions and ideas for helping your struggling learner with his struggles in math.

Finding the Right Curriculum

When you first start homeschooling, you soon realize that everyone’s homeschool looks different.  There are so many curriculum options and homeschooling styles it can be overwhelming!! The biggest questions to ask yourself when looking at a curriculum:

  1. What kind of teacher are you?  Do you like to have a script to follow?  Do you like to be able to “change” things at times?  How much support do you need to teach a subject (how strong are you in that subject)?
  2. What kind of learner is your child?  Every child is different and learns differently.  Some need visual, some need more auditory, some are hands-on.  Some like colorful worksheets and some are distracted by cute pictures and poems on their worksheets.

When parents sign up for the classes and want a curriculum that will work with our program, I always recommend they look at Math U See.  I have used Math U See with my own son, who has Autism. The simple layout of the worksheets and hands-on presentation of concepts through Decimal Street (place value) and the use of the colored blocks, makes math meaningful and visual for learners who struggle.  It gives them an image to “see” in their mind when they are trying to find the answer. The introduction of place value addition and subtracting (adding and subtracting 10’s and 100’s) in Alpha has allowed my son to have a strong foundation continuing into Beta. A strong foundation at the beginning allows students to soar higher and faster later.

Why do we love Math U See?

First, there are the video explanations 

The video presentation is great for showing parents the concepts behind what is being taught, and how to teach the lesson.  Some older students have reported watching the DVD lesson with parents or by themselves to learn the material. I understand how this might work with some students and circumstances.  My son needs me teaching him one on one for him to really grasp the concept. The wonderful thing about this curriculum is it is easily tailored to your child’s learning style.  

Mastery vs. Spiral

I love the way this program teaches to mastery and is easy to modify for students based on need.  I have divided up worksheets into parts to be completed at different times. I have used more or fewer of the lesson and review pages depending on how much practice my son needed for a lesson.  Some parents and students do prefer a spiral method. Sometimes, though, a spiral method (where a concept is addressed again and again, each time adding more to it) can be confusing and frustrating for struggling learners, or children with memory issues who need repetition and daily practice to retain and increase skills.

Memorization vs. Strategy

I love the approach to addition and subtraction this program uses, with emphasis on how many it takes to get from 9 to 10 or 8 to 10 in order to help students have a strategy to solve problems, not just memorize facts.  Many of the students who come to me struggle with memory problems, and the ability to use a STRATEGY, not just rely on memory enables them to be stronger in math.  

Finally, Math U See is great for struggling writers.

Have a child who struggles with fine motor skills?  My son does too. When we started our first year of homeschooling, my son could not even hold a pencil.  He struggled with writing simple things like numbers and letters. Math U See allowed me to teach him math concepts without having to worry about a lot of writing.  I could even write for him on days that writing numbers was too much. I was able to teach to his strengths while supporting his weakness. Because of this, he is thriving in math while we work to support the writing.

Should you use the blocks vs. digital app vs. no blocks?

It is important to have the blocks in the beginning.  If cost is an issue, you may be able to buy a set used or even borrow a set for a while from someone.  However, I don’t see how you could successfully implement this curriculum as it is intended without the blocks (or at least using something equivalent such as an abacus).  The Digital App would work well for visual students or older students. It would allow the same visual concept with lower cost and take up less space.

I have found that when my son begins a new concept, he goes back to those blocks for a day or two until he learns the concepts, then is able to “see” the blocks in his head again to continue working through the concept as he continues through the lesson and test.  He needs to be able to touch, manipulate, and otherwise experience the math through the blocks. While we will use an abacus at times (it is easier for travel), it is always the blocks we return to. Also, the blocks are used in the curriculum into Algebra, so they are a good investment if you are planning to stay with the curriculum long-term, and there are enough to use with more than one child at a time.

Whatever your decision, ultimately you have to find something that works for you and your child.  For us, that was Math U See.  

Do you need additional math help for your struggling learner?  Find Live, online class with True North Homeschool Academy’s Struggling Learners Department!

Whether your child is struggling with addition and subtraction, multiplication and division, or fractions and decimals, we have a class for you!  These interactive, hands-on games and activities help give students a strong foundation in math to help them whatever their post-high school goals are.  Our positive, collaborative learning environment means the students feel supported, and comfortable enough to “try” even if they don’t know the answer for sure!

Contributor

Amy holds a Masters of Science in Education, Specializing in Curriculum and Instruction, from the University of Central Missouri and a Bachelors of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies from Texas State University-San Marcos.  Also, she spent 2 years of college studying Interpretation for the Deaf and Deaf Studies and knows American Sign Language. Her teaching certifications include Special Education, English as a Second Language and Generalist (early childhood through fourth). She is now part of the Struggling Learners Department of True North Homeschool Academy and loves the discovery approach to learning.

 

 

Are you struggling to find a math curriculum for your struggling learner?  As a homeschool mom, math is often one of the biggest challenges and this is especially true for a special needs student.  Find out why we think Math U See is  a great curriculum for struggling learners.  #TrueNorthHomeschoolAcademy  #homeschoolmath #strugglinglearners

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